Blog Tour Review: Sweet Tooth by Tim

Sweet Tooth by Tim AndersonWhat’s a sweets-loving young boy growing up gay in North Carolina in the eighties supposed to think when he’s diagnosed with type 1 diabetes? That God is punishing him, naturally.

This was, after all, when gay-hating Jesse Helms was his senator, AIDS was still the boogeyman, and no one was saying, “It gets better.” And if stealing a copy of a gay porno magazine from the newsagent was a sin, then surely what the men inside were doing to one another was much worse.

Sweet Tooth is Tim Anderson’s uproarious memoir of life after his hormones and blood sugar both went berserk at the age of fifteen. With Morrissey and The Smiths as the soundtrack, Anderson self-deprecatingly recalls love affairs with vests and donuts, first crushes, coming out, and inaugural trips to gay bars. What emerges is the story of a young man trying to build a future that won’t involve crippling loneliness or losing a foot to his disease—and maybe even one that, no matter how unpredictable, can still be pretty sweet.

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This review is part of Tim Anderson’s book tour with TLC Book Tours. Find out more about the tour and all the stops here.TLC Book Tours

You can find more tour information and upcoming events by clicking through to TLC Book Tours. Continue reading

Review: God Loves Hair by Vivek Shraya

God Loves HairGod Loves Hair is a collection of 20 short stories following a tender, intellectual, and curious child as he navigates complex realms of sexuality, gender, racial politics, religion, and belonging.

Told with the poignant insight and honesty that only the voice of a young mind can convey, each story is accompanied by a vivid illustration by Toronto artist Juliana Neufeld.

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Sunday Sessions: Tumble Turn

I began teaching in 2009. Yes, I am a young, fresh, new teacher, some would say overenthusiastic, I would say those “some” don’t know me very well. My head teacher describes me as laid back, easygoing, and “makes it look easy”. Note: I am stressed 24/7. Teaching is one of the jobs you either love, hate, or just do it because you don’t know what else you’re going to do. I love it, and hate it sometimes too, but mostly love it.

I did my first year at a different school to the one in which I teach now. I began at my current school in 2010 and am a permanent placement at this current school. I love this school.

When I got there my head teacher showed me the book room. It’s dark, dusty and about 5kms from the English staffroom. I went down there to look at what books the school had and I found this one book which looked brand new, the spines hadn’t been cracked and there were no numbers in the front (numbering so we know which student has which book so we can get it back). The book had a bright blue cover and crazy writing. I grabbed it, flicked through, took it back to the staffroom and it read it over the course of the recesses and lunch that day. I loved it.

Tumble Turn is by Doug MacLeod and follows the life of Dominic Dear. An almost 13 year old boy, who is confused about his life, his friends, his loves, and his mysterious Uncle Peri. The book is written in a series of emails between Dominic and his Uncle Peri. Like most 13 year olds, Dominic is curious, struggling to fit in and questioning a friendship he has had since he was a little boy. His next door neighbour is his best friend, Christopher Ball, though because of a tv series the boys loved when they were young, Dominic calls Christopher Crystal, so it’s Crystal Ball. One of the many subtle jokes MacLeod uses to engage his audiences, and believe it or not, my year 8 students always pick up on these very subtle but very funny jokes. Continue reading