#809: The Boy Who Could See Demons by Carolyn Jess-Cooke

The Boy Who Could See Demons“I first met my demon the morning that Mum said Dad had gone.”

Alex Connolly is ten years old, likes onions on toast, and can balance on the back legs of his chair for fourteen minutes. His best friend is a 9000-year-old demon called Ruen.

When his depressive mother attempts suicide yet again, Alex meets child psychiatrist Anya. Still bearing the scars of her own daughter’s battle with schizophrenia, Anya fears for Alex’s mental health and attempts to convince him that Ruen doesn’t exist.

But as she runs out of medical proof for many of Alex’s claims, she is faced with a question: does Alex suffer from schizophrenia, or can he really see demons?
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Review: Madness a Memoir by Kate Richards

Madness: A Memoir by Kate RichardsMadness is a real world for the many thousands of people who are right now living within it. It never apologises. Sometimes it is a shadow, ever present, without regard for the sun. Sometimes it is a well of dark water with no bottom, or a levitation device to the stars.

Madness, a memoir is an insight into what it’s like to live with psychosis over a period of ten years, in which bouts of acute illness are interspersed with periods of sanity. The world is beautiful and terrifying and sometimes magical. The sanctity of life is at times precious and at times precarious and always fragile. It’s a story of learning to manage illness with courage and creativity, of achieving balance and living well. It is for everyone now living within the world of madness, for everyone touched by this world, and for everyone seeking to further his or her understanding of it, whether you think of madness as a biological illness of the brain or an understandable part of the continuum of the human condition.

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BA Features Shadows in the Sun by Gayathri Ramprasad

Welcome to BA’s Book Features showcasing a small collection of books to be released this week, or showcasing a special feature as part of a blog tour and promotion event. If you’d like to have your book featured on Bookish Ardour please send an enquiry.

Author Gayathri Ramprasad and her memoir Shadows in the Sun

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Blog Tour Review: Shadows in the Sun by Gayathri Ramprasad

Shadows in the Sun by Gayathri RamprasadAmericans have become immune to the terms, drugs, and behaviors associated with depression even as its reputation has grown as a debilitating and sometimes fatal mental illness. But in India and elsewhere the stigma associated with this condition is cultural and runs deep. In a sweeping narrative that spans the globe from Bangalore to Portland, Oregon, Gayathri Ramprasad shares her harrowing journey through depression to recovery in SHADOWS IN THE SUN: Healing from Depression and Finding the Light Within.
Gayathri Ramprasad was a blossoming, young Indian girl being raised by a loving family steeped in tradition. But as she grew into an adolescent, she found it more and more difficult to cope with the routine ups and downs of life. The “tipping point” came after Ramprasad failed a class at college and became inconsolable. Unlike a reasonably healthy person, who might be upset at first but come to a place of acceptance and a rational state of mind, Gayathri could not stop herself from obsessing over her failure and what this would mean to her future and her family.
Gayathri’s arranged marriage, moving to America, and the birth of her first child all led to suicidal ideation and attempts, along with varying degrees of fear and chaos for her growing family. At her lowest point, she was found digging a grave for herself in her backyard with her bare hands, mumbling unintelligibly, with her young daughter sitting in the house alone. Over time, she learned how to respect her illness without letting it dominate her existence. She also realized she wasn’t alone. Having grown up in a family and culture that initially thought her illness was a curse, was surprised to learn that her father, brother, and sister all struggled with mental illness. Today Gayathri Ramprasad is president of ASHA International, a nonprofit organization she founded, whose mission is her calling—to promote personal, organizational, and community wellness around the world. SHADOWS IN THE SUN illustrates how troubled a person can become and how wonderful it is when she can walk out of the darkness and into the light of recovery.

TLC Book Tours___

This review is part of Gayathri Ramprasad’s book tour with TLC Book Tours. Find out more about the tour and all the stops here.

For more information about upcoming tours and events please visit TLC Book Tours.

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BAsPC: The First Books

BA's Posting Challenge 2013-14Welcome to BA’s Posting Challenge for book bloggers! In an effort to consistently create content on BA I thought I would take part in a 30 day blogging challenge (I have to mix it up or else I get bored), but realised I don’t want to, nor do I have the time, to create a post every single day. Instead I decided to attempt to create a post once a week with content other than a review.

This is how BA’s Posting Challenge began.

Now BA’s Posting Challenge has become an annual event spanning the year’s busiest time. November for Wrimos everywhere, December for the holiday season, January for New Year’s and recovery, February for the lovers, and March to finally wind down after all the craziness.

BA’s Posting Challenge is for those book bloggers who want content and can’t think of anything to post, want a break without their blog dying, and just want to join in somewhere with the blogosphere community. This  challenge has a focus on books, book blogs, and personal topics scattered throughout. Find all the topics here. Continue reading

Review: Sybil by Flora Rheta Schreiber

Sybil by Flora Reta Schreiber

‘How are you today?’ the doctor asked. ‘I’m fine’, was the reply. ‘But Sybil isn’t. She was so sick she couldn’t come. So I came instead.’

Sybil is the story of a woman with sixteen separate personalities, and was instrumental in influencing the definition and diagnosis of multiple personality disorder.

Sybil’s diagnosis has since been called into question – but, forty years after it was first published, her story remains a gripping and disturbing account of one woman’s struggle for mental stability and happiness.

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Review

I began reading Sybil with an idea of the story’s surrounding controversy. When the author’s account of Sybil’s story came out, it made quite an impact and resulted in a movie. Why wouldn’t it? This poor woman had sixteen personalities and her life was not liveable. Her childhood was horrible, reading about it is traumatic enough, and then she’s constantly questioning everything around her. Even if it’s not true, the story itself has some serious details to create a riveting tale. Continue reading

Blog Tour Review: The Isolation Door by Anish Majumdar

The Isolation Door by Anish MajumdarNeil Kapoor, 23, is desperate to create a life beyond the shadow of his mother’s schizophrenia. Years of successive relapses and rehabilitation’s have forced his father into the role of caretaker and Neil into that of silent witness. But there is no light within this joyless ritual, and any hope for the future rests on finding an exit.

Amidst her latest breakdown, Neil attends drama school in pursuit of a role that might better express the truth of who he is. What started as a desperate gambit becomes the fragile threads of a new life. A relationship blooms with Emily, and each finds strength – and demons – in the other. New friendships with Quincy and Tim grow close and complex. But the emotional remove needed to keep these two lives separate destabilizes the family. Neil’s father, the one constant in the chaos, buckles under the pressure. Enlisting the aid of an Aunt with means and questionable motives, Neil plies ever-greater deceptions to keep the darkness at bay. But this time there will be no going back. As his mother falls to terrifying depths a decision must be made: family or freedom?

In this powerful fiction debut, Anish Majumdar shines a much-needed light into the journey of those coping with serious mental disorders and the loved ones who walk alongside them. Incisive and filled with moments of strange beauty, it marks the arrival of a unique voice in American letters.

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