Review: Bathing the Lion by Jonathan Carroll

Bathing the LionIn Jonathan Carroll’s surreal masterpiece, Bathing the Lion, five people who live in the same New England town go to sleep one night and all share the same hyper-realistic dream. Some of these people know each other; some don’t.

When they wake the next day all of them know what has happened. All five were at one time “mechanics,” a kind of cosmic repairman whose job is to keep order in the universe and clean up the messes made both by sentient beings and the utterly fearsome yet inevitable Chaos that periodically rolls through, wreaking mayhem wherever it touches down—a kind of infinitely powerful, merciless tornado. Because the job of a mechanic is grueling and exhausting, after a certain period all of them are retired and sent to different parts of the cosmos to live out their days as “civilians.” Their memories are wiped clean and new identities are created for them that fit the places they go to live out their natural lives to the end.

For the first time all retired mechanics are being brought back to duty: Chaos has a new plan, and it’s not looking good for mankind…

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Book Trailers: In the House Upon the Dirt Between the Lake and the Woods

Every Saturday I share a book trailer of new releases, books we (other readers and myself) love, want to read, and anything that fits in with BA, in the hopes of helping readers find something new to enjoy.

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If you’d like to share a trailer for other readers to watch, including if it is your own, please read through my Special Features Policy and feel free to forward any enquiries.

BA Features The Poor Man’s Guide to Suicide by Andrew Armacost

Welcome to BA’s Book Features showcasing a small collection of books to be released this week, or showcasing a special feature as part of a blog tour and promotion event. If you’d like to have your book featured on Bookish Ardour please send an enquiry.

Author Andrew Armacost and his newest release The Poor Man’s Guide to Suicide

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Review: The Rag Issue #5

The Rag Issue #5The Rag’s 5th issue is now out. This is our first issue as a biannual publication and has about twice as much content as our previous quarterly releases. Many stories featured here examine questions of good and evil and what drives people to act immorally.

The Rag’s Mission Statement

Our mission is to seek out powerful new literary voices and bring them to light. We see electronic publishing as an opportunity to turn back time to an era of affordable distribution and open competition, and it allows us to reach a broader audience and inject new life into the literary market.

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Review: Tampa by Alissa Nutting

Tampa by Alissa NuttingCeleste Price is an eighth-grade English teacher in suburban Tampa. She is attractive. She drives a red Corvette. Her husband, Ford, is rich, square-jawed and devoted to her. But Celeste has a secret. She has a singular sexual obsession – fourteen-year-old boys.

It is a craving she pursues with sociopathic meticulousness and forethought. Within weeks of her first term at a new school, Celeste has lured the charmingly modest Jack Patrick into her web – car rides after dark, rendezvous at Jack’s house while his single father works the late shift, and body-slamming encounters in Celeste’s empty classroom between periods. It is bliss.

Celeste must constantly confront the forces threatening their affair – the perpetual risk of exposure, Jack’s father’s own attraction to her, and the ticking clock as Jack leaves innocent boyhood behind. But the insatiable Celeste is remorseless. She deceives everyone, is close to no one and cares little for anything but her pleasure.

With crackling, stampeding, rampantly sexualized prose, Tampa is a grand, satirical, serio-comic examination of desire and a scorching literary debut.

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Beatrice and Virgil Giveaway for Australian Readers

IT’S FREEBIE TIME! AGAIN!

For the second time in one week, lucky ducks, I have a giveaway for Australian readers (don’t worry international readers, I have a freebie coming up for you as well). Would you like a chance to win a copy of Yann Martel’s Beatrice and Virgil? I’m going to assume that was a yes. I bought a copy a few months back and then realised I already had one. What do I need with a spare copy? Seriously? One lucky reader will get an unread paperback copy of Beatrice and Virgil by Yann Martel, which I reviewed last year.

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Beatrice and Viril

Fate takes many forms. . . .Beatrice and Virgil by Yann Martel

When Henry receives a letter from an elderly taxidermist, it poses a puzzle that he cannot resist. As he is pulled further into the world of this strange and calculating man, Henry becomes increasingly involved with the lives of a donkey and a howler monkey—named Beatrice and Virgil—and the epic journey they undertake together.

With all the spirit and originality that made Life of Pi so beloved, this brilliant new novel takes the reader on a haunting odyssey. On the way Martel asks profound questions about life and art, truth and deception, responsibility and complicity.

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Interested? All you have to do is fill in the below form before Tuesday the 19th, 12pm AEDST. I won’t be announcing the winner here on BA so it can be a surprise. Don’t worry about sharing your details with me, I only need them to make sure the winner gets the prize and after that I’ll delete all your details. No one else will see them. Continue reading

Review: Beatrice and Virgil by Yann Martel

Fate takes many forms. . . .

When Henry receives a letter from an elderly taxidermist, it poses a puzzle that he cannot resist. As he is pulled further into the world of this strange and calculating man, Henry becomes increasingly involved with the lives of a donkey and a howler monkey—named Beatrice and Virgil—and the epic journey they undertake together.

With all the spirit and originality that made Life of Pi so beloved, this brilliant new novel takes the reader on a haunting odyssey. On the way Martel asks profound questions about life and art, truth and deception, responsibility and complicity.

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Continue reading