Review: The 100 by Kass Morgan

The 100No one has set foot on Earth in centuries — until now.

Ever since a devastating nuclear war, humanity has lived on spaceships far above Earth’s radioactive surface. Now, one hundred juvenile delinquents — considered expendable by society — are being sent on a dangerous mission: to recolonize the planet. It could be their second chance at life…or it could be a suicide mission.

CLARKE was arrested for treason, though she’s haunted by the memory of what she really did. WELLS, the chancellor’s son, came to Earth for the girl he loves — but will she ever forgive him? Reckless BELLAMY fought his way onto the transport pod to protect his sister, the other half of the only pair of siblings in the universe. And GLASS managed to escape back onto the ship, only to find that life there is just as dangerous as she feared it would be on Earth.

Confronted with a savage land and haunted by secrets from their pasts, the hundred must fight to survive. They were never meant to be heroes, but they may be mankind’s last hope.

Review

I admit, I didn’t have high hopes for The 100. I’m a cynical person when it comes to hyped up young adult fiction. The tv show based on the book aired recently here in Australia. I kept seeing the trailer for it when watching television. While I love a good sci-fi, I still have the part of my brain that rolls my eyes and thinks sci-fi television shows are lame.

I had the same thoughts when it came to The 100. Except the more I saw the previews, the more curious I became, and then I eventually decided I needed to read the story. I find the suspense is always better when the plot unravels in written form. I still appreciate a good television show, but I have to read the book first. Most of the time.

I did have some issues with the story. The character names threw me. Names like Clarke, Wells, Glass, and Bellamy made me think the characters were addressing each other with surnames. Nope. Their parents come into the picture and also call their children these names. I kept wondering, if your name is Sonja, why’d you name your kid Glass? Where’s your imagination Sonja?

It did make it worse and more obvious when these uniquely named children were amongst kids with ordinary names like Luke and Lily. Even Thalia and Octavia sound like given names when compared to names like Wells and Clarke.

There were also the already established romances amongst the characters. I’m used to romances developing along with the story so that surprised me. I don’t think it mattered in the end for me. Although the romance does affect the plot itself and romance does annoy me, it got to a point where I didn’t really mind. There is character development present and they are relateable, understandable, and fleshed out in their personalities.

It does help the characters don’t just focus on their loves. They’ve been dumped on Earth and they are driven to surivive, alongside their love-lives. Thankfully, this saved the whole story for me. It’s one thing for them to be mooning over each other, but having characters lose their head makes it interesting.

I love the concept. I went into this not giving it much hope and now I just want to throw all my day’s plans out the window so I can read the sequel! Suprise to me! This is a good surprise though and I love how all the characters are criminals in some way. Not that being a criminal is a good thing, but the reasons for what they have done to get themselves in this situation is drawn out. It’s not drawn out in an exhausting and frustrating way either. I think it’s written just right and drawn out just enough. Bits and pieces of information about the characters come along in the story smoothly without jarring the reader or feeling convenient.

Now, I must read the next one!

As for the television show… Straight away I just knew it would not win me over like the book did. I tell you, the book is almost, always better! I mean, who the hell is Jasper and Finn for crying out loud?

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