Top Ten Tuesday: Childhood Favourites

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted at The Broke and Bookish with a new list subject every Tuesday.

This week’s Top Ten is Top Ten Childhood Faves. I’m one of those people who loved stories from an early age, but don’t remember much of what I read. I’m also one of those people who didn’t read well-known novels like Enid Blyton’s stories. I do remember the following with fondness, re-reading them, and I still have copies of most of them too.

  1. The Complete Adventures of Snugglepot and Cuddlepie by May Gibbs – May Gibbs would have to be one of Australia’s iconic writers. Her stories use characters created from items you’d find in the bush such as banksia and gum nuts.
  2. What’s The Time Rory Wolf? by Gillian McClure – A lone wolf comes down to a village to make friends and guess what they play? Yes, what’s the time? I think that’s hilarious, but What’s The Time Rory Wolf? was also a story that scared me when I was younger. That wolf acted friendly, but I swear he was going to eat everyone.
  3. The Real Mother Goose – It’s basically a collection of fairy tales and rhymes like Humpty Dumpty. The copy I read as a child is still around, albeit looking very warn, and I think I got it as a hand-me-down from my sister (she’s the one who had Enid Blyton).
  4. Little Tiger, Get Well Soon! by Janosch – I loved this story! I still love it. Little Tiger becomes ill so his friend plays doctor and they’re really cute.
  5. Are You My Mother? by P.D. Eastman –  A baby bird hatches from it’s egg to discover his mother is nowhere in sight so he decides to go and search for her, mistaking all sorts of animals and objects (from memory I think one might be a tractor)  for his mother. He goes and asks each animal and object he comes across, ‘Are you my Mother?’ I read the crap out of this story and then went and bought a copy when I was older.
  6. Fairy Tales of The World by M. Novak – I got this one as a present from my neighbour, who was my bestie at the time, when I was about seven. It’s full of fairy tales from around the world, hence the title, and I love those stories. When you’re growing up in a country like Australia with typical fairy tales, there’s an extra mystery and wonder when you’re able to read fairy tales from other cultures and countries.
  7. Choose Your Own Adventure by R.A. Montgomery – I remember these books being the most borrowed from my school library, which means I was probably the main one borrowing them (there were only 6 kids in my year…). If you haven’t heard about these, it’s basically what the title says, you choose where the story is going to end up. Of course you don’t always know exactly, unless you read it enough, but you have different options at certain intervals and I thought it was always fun.
  8. The Babysitter’s Club by Ann M. Martin – Another series I borrowed a lot from the school library, but the funny thing is I barely remember them. I just remember going between the stacks and hunting down all the titles.
  9. A Fly Went By by Mike McClintock – I still have a copy of this one too, but don’t remember it that well to be honest. I think it may have been a lesser read one, but every time I see the cover I still have fond feelings for it.
  10. Books for Diabetics – Being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes just before my 4th birthday means having quite a lot of reading material. There’s a few books I remember well and I still have. One where I’ve drawn all over it (what else do you expect from a 4 year old? They needed some colour!), another one that creeps me out because all the kids go on a camp, get together to have their injections, and smile through it all (I’ve never done that and I used to hang out with other diabetic kids). They’re always smiling when they’re jabbing themselves. And another one involves a dinosaur. Yes, because dinosaurs get diabetes too. Didn’t you know?

That’s it for my list. What are your childhood favourites?

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